Notice my contact info to the right, if you want to contact me with any questions. I would also like to say that I do attempt to give credit where credit is due. I do not make any claims to cakes in my blog except the ones in my slideshow. If I show a cake I will try to post some type of identifer with it, however, if I don't know who posted the cake it is impossible for me to do that. I am only using the cake to illustrate a specific technique.

Tuesday, March 8, 2011

Different styles of Buttercream

I don't know if you are aware, but there are different types of buttercream. I know of at least 4 types. They are American Buttercream, Italian Meringue Buttercream, Swiss Meringue Buttercream and French Buttercream.

With the first, our traditional buttercream, usually one would use a combination of shortening and butter mixed with a flavoring such as vanilla and powdered sugar. If it were a crusting buttercream, it would likely also contain some meringue powder.

With Italian Meringue Buttercream you would heat sugar and water to about 238 degrees while mixing egg whites and cream of tartar to stiff peaks. Once the sugar reaches the proper temperature you would slowly add the sugar syrup to the egg whites and beat until the bowl is just warm to the touch. Then one would add chunks of butter a little at a time and whip until smooth. Warren Brown of Cake Love has a really good video for this on youtube.

Then you have what is known as Swiss Meringue Buttercream, which in some aspects is similar to Italian Meringue Buttercream. And the best thing I can do is point you in the direction of a blog called From Scratch Sf, because she has already done all the work for you in this wonderful picture tutorial. You may want to check it out if you are interested in trying another type of buttercream. She says that I can link to her page, so you can share in her tutorial. So thank you so much for sharing.

And lastly, French Buttercream one would beat egg yolks in a mixer and while mixing eggs also combine sugar and water in saucepan and cook to 238 degrees. Pour into yolks with mixter running and mix on med speed until the mixture reaches room temperature. Add butter a little at a time. You can also add water to smooth the consistency a little. I will try to get an actual recipe for this one to share with you. I have messaged someone in regards to this, but I am still waiting for a reply. I will edit this post if she gives me permission to use her recipe.

I would imagine there are probably many variations that I am unaware of, and if there are, I hope someone shares them with us. I just thought I would let you know a little about the ones I am aware of.

1 comment:

  1. I promised I would post the French Buttercream when I got the recipe, so here it is. For anyone that is interested.


    6 lg egg yolks
    1 c sugar
    4 sticks butter
    1 tsp boiling water ( use hot tap)

    Beat yolks in mixer until light in color. Combine the sugar and 1/2 c water in saucepan and cook to 238 degrees. Pour into yolks with mixture running and mix on med speed until room temp. Add the butter a little at a time. The tsp of water just changes the consistency to super smooth. This is a preference... not necessary. I also use the water to dissolve espresso powder.